Aqua Spa Offers a Refreshing Getaway From the Busy World A Short Boat Trip Away From Helsinki

Aqua Spa at the Tallink Spa & Conference Hotel offers a luxurious pause in the busy world about one kilometer from the Tallink terminal. Picture: Tony Öhberg for Finland Today

Greek statues greet the visitor just a short stroll from the Tallink harbor in front of a tall conference hotel. After the formalities, which include picking up the wristband that will not only lock the door of the storage cabinet but will also store all data of the drinks you consume, you are ready for indulgence and relaxation.

It’s Saturday morning, and it’s quiet. Under the guarding eyes of the naked statues, the visitor dips into the pool in swimwear. The water is warm, and the surrounding walls of glass rise very high. Focus is sharpened under the massaging waterfall. The mind is relaxed with a Mojito in the pool by the bench that rises under the water, and once again we’re reminded that we are abroad. The way government runs things in our home country, there’s no hope for a drink in the pool in near future. And never at this price.

After downing a beer, it’s time to float and crawl. The pool extends outside where a father and son play catch with a beach ball in the bright sun. They don’t mind to be photographed.

In the Turkish bath, it’s steamy and the tiles are warm. The Finnish sauna is very large and relatively hot, almost as good as in its native country.

Aqua Spa is a great way to start the day during a weekend getaway in Tallinn.

Beer in the pool? Sure. A Kir Royal? They can do that, too. Picture: Tony Öhberg for Finland Today

The outside pool is open year round. Picture: Tony Öhberg for Finland Today

The Romanesque decoration makes you forget that you are visiting the capital of Estonia. Picture: Tony Öhberg for Finland Today

Aqua Spa is located at the first floor of the conference hotel. During our trip the hotel was full so we were offered an option to book a room at the Tallink City Hotel at the heart of the capital.

After an easy walk, we accommodated a Business Class room at the ninth floor. The room was cozy and offered amenities such as a bathrobe, slippers, a coffee machine and a flat-screen TV. The view overlooked the hotel courtyard from the heights; it was the backyard of the city center and the distant location from the busy streets added to the peace and silence — the room was very quiet.

The hotel building was built in the ‘70s. In 1974, during the Soviet reign, it was known as Tallinn Service Centre, offering a wide range of services from a personal tailoring shop to a beauty parlor, including the biggest hat boutique of the town.

The fact sheet on the wall of the hotel’s lobby says that “around a thousand people were working in the giant Service Centre house.” The positions were valued highly, and only the best were employed.” Another source reminded us that due to the numerous businesses working shoulder to shoulder, the walls were built quite soundproof. The rooms are likely some of the quietest the city has to offer. In 2004, the building was opened as a hotel, fully renovated and altered.

After a peaceful night, the room included a lush buffet breakfast at the first floor with the usual salads, bread and good cheeses.

And the service?

Cheerful. Kind. Professional.

After such a nice morning, we were thinking of visiting the spa again . . . .

Tallink City Hotel is located in the city center. Picture: Tony Öhberg for Finland Today

The hotel lobby offers a piano bar, where the visitor can relax to the sound of smooth jazz. Picture: Tony Öhberg for Finland Today

Restaurant Sume serves breakfast and à la carte dishes such as ‘Lemongrass roasted cod with Jerusalem artichoke gnocchi, glasswort and citrus sauce.’ Picture: Tony Öhberg for Finland Today

Tallink is the leading shipping operator on the Baltic Sea. In 2017, the company celebrates the tenth anniversary of the operation of shuttle vessels on Tallinn-Helsinki route. Within this period, the high-speed vessels have transported 30 million people between the two capitals. The trip from Helsinki to Tallinn takes between two or three and a half hours, depending on the ship. In 2016, AS Tallink Grupp transported a record number of passengers: nearly 9.5 million people.

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