The objective of the Report on Internal Security that was submitted to the Parliament on Thursday is that Finland will be an even safer country for all people and population groups in the future.

Maria Ohisalo, the minister of the interior. Photograph: Tony Öhberg/Finland Today

These are some of the internal threats revealed by the Report on Internal Security that was submitted to the Parliament on Thursday:

  • Increasing cyber-facilitated crime and cybercrime
  • Climate change
  • Biodiversity loss
  • Migration
  • Pandemics

However, 96 percent of Finns feel that their lives are safe, according to a survey that was included in the report. “What kind of security problems a person faces in everyday life strongly depends on their personal situation, circumstances or experiences,” the ministry noted in a statement.

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Minister of the Interior Maria Ohisalo listed marginalization, social unease and multiple deprivation (mental health problems, social exclusion, etc.) as the biggest threats to internal security in Finland. “Action is needed from society as a whole to combat these. The key objective of internal and external security measures is to safeguard fundamental and human rights for everyone,” Ohisalo said.

The Report on Internal Security aims to ensure the further development of internal security so that Finland will be an even safer country for all people and population groups in the future. The report looks ahead until 2030.

This objective will be implemented for example by

  • shifting the focus of the authorities’ activities from corrective services to prevention,
  • maintaining a high level of trust in internal security operators among all population groups and
  • ensuring that assistance is quickly available in emergencies throughout the country.

“We need to prevent multi-generational deprivation and, in particular, strengthen the sense of security of the underprivileged,” Ohisalo said.