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Picture: Puukilainen/Flickr

Picture: Puukilainen/Flickr

 

Every year the New Year’s Eve shows its dark side in form of violence and injuries. The beginning of the year 2015 was no exception.

  • Three people were killed in accidents during the New Year’s Eve. One person died in a fire in Helsinki’s Myllypuro and another during the New Year’s Day in Päijät-Häme’s Nastola in Southern Finland. In addition, a driver of a snowmobile was killed after crashing into a tree in Raahe, Northern Ostrobothnia.
  • Two people were seriously injured in fires at Lohja in Southern Finland and Siilinjärvi, Northern Savonia.
  • A young woman was killed in Joensuu after falling out from a window.
  • The police had a busy night. Helsinki police alone was busy with a total of 420 missions. In comparison, the amount was lower than in 2013, when the number of missions was 444.
  • Most missions in Helsinki during the New Year’s Eve were assaults (48), drunken people (59), vandalism (55) and different house calls (32).
  • In Helsinki, two men were caught after threatening with a gun. One, born in 1986, was carrying a shotgun and a revolver and was caught without resistance in Paloheinä. The other man, born in 1963, had pulled out a gun and said that he was going out to start shooting people. The police caught the man from inside an apartment in Vartiokylä.
  • Helsinki police gave a breath test during the New Year’s Eve to a total of 2,100 drivers. Seven are suspected from drunken driving.
  • At least ten people suffered eye injuries after fireworks. The amount is about the same as during the previous years but significantly lower than during the previous decade, when tens of people suffered eye injuries during the New Year’s Eve.
Tony Öhberg